Page 69

proefschrift_Schols_SLV

  Near‐infrared fluorescence laparoscopy of the cystic duct and artery in pigs  67  Introduction  In  patients  with  symptomatic  cholecystolithiasis  and/or  cholecystitis,  laparoscopic  cholecystectomy is currently the standard of care in most Western countries. Although  an  incidence  of  only  0.7  percent  is  reported  for  bile  duct  injury  during  laparoscopic  cholecystectomy,  it  constitutes  a  severe  complication  which  may  result  in  increased  long‐term  morbidity  and  as  a  consequence,  increased  costs.  Furthermore  it  may  negatively affect the quality of life of patients1‐3.  Near‐infrared  fluorescence  imaging  after  intravenous  indocyanine  green  (ICG)  administration  is  an  innovative  and  promising  laparoscopic  imaging  method  for  intraoperative  visualization  of  crucial  anatomical  structures4.  Several  clinical  pilot  studies  have  demonstrated  its  usefulness  and  feasibility  for  real‐time  intraoperative  identification of extra‐hepatic bile ducts and arteries to assist in safe and time‐efficient  gallbladder removal. However, this new technique needs optimization with respect to  imaging systems and injected fluorophores.   CW800‐CA is a relatively new fluorophore, which like ICG also has 800 nm fluorescent  capabilities. It has not yet been FDA cleared for clinical use, but has equal low risk of  toxicity as ICG and incorporates favourable characteristics for fluorescence imaging of  vital  anatomy5,6.  The  most  advantageous  characteristic  of  CW800‐CA  is  its  increased  hydrophilicity,  resulting  in  improved  secretion  into  bile  and  earlier  fluorescence  illumination of the bile ducts5,6. This study was conducted to assess the performance of  CW800‐CA  versus  the  clinically  already  available  ICG  for  near‐infrared  fluorescence  laparoscopy of the cystic duct and cystic artery in pigs using a commercially available  laparoscopic fluorescence imaging system.  Materials and methods  This  study  was  conducted  at  the  central  animal  facilities  of  Maastricht  University  (Maastricht, The Netherlands). Animals were used in compliance with the regulations of  the Dutch legislation for animal research, and the study protocol was approved by the  Animal Ethics Committee of Maastricht University (DEC‐UM, project number 2012‐098).  A  pig  model  was  chosen  because  of  its  similarity  with  human  anatomy.  Six  female  Dutch landrace pigs, weighing 35 kg, were used for the current study.  Laparoscopic fluorescence imaging system  A commercially available, laparoscopic fluorescence imaging system (Karl Storz GmbH &  CO. KG, Tuttlingen, Germany) was used. The system includes a plasma light guide and 


proefschrift_Schols_SLV
To see the actual publication please follow the link above