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The War of the Austrian Succession 96 43 (1740 -1748). Toutbreak of the War of the Austrian Succession. The war this period there was another British hospital in the hamlet ofhospital. Until its closure on 28 February, 1747, the hospitaladmitted a total of 1,165 patients, of whom 119 died. Duringhe succession to the throne of Maria Theresia after thedeath of her father Charles VI in 1740 led to the was about the balance of power in Europe. On one side there Scharn, east of Maastricht. This may have been a mobile were the French with a number of allies and on the other side hospital. Austria-Hungary and Great Britain and their allies. In 1743 the The English hospital at Maastricht was again taken into Republic of the Seven United Netherlands became involved in use with doctor Wintringham in charge. This was probably Sir the war when they sent troops to Germany to support an Clifton Wintringham (1710 -1794), who was later to become English expedition. From 1744, the Southern or Austrian the personal physician of the duke of Cumberland and the Netherlands, which largely covers the territory that today is English king George III. The hospital closed again by the end of Belgium, became a scene of battle and from 1747 the French November and by then had admitted over three thousand sick made it clear that the lands of the Republic would not be and wounded, of whom 326 had died. This large number can be spared. The invasion of Zeeuws-Vlaanderen and the siege and explained by the bloody character of the battle of Lafelt on capture of Bergen op Zoom gave evidence of this. Between 2 July, 1747. Nineteen British regiments took part in this battle, 1746 and 1748, the war made itself clearly felt in Maastricht. and suffered losses of four hundred dead and over nine First, battles were fought at Rocourt and Lafelt, near hundred wounded. On 5 July alone, around eight hundred Maastricht, and in 1748 Maastricht came under siege and was English wounded were brought to Maastricht, together with an captured. The Treaty of Aachen in 1748 signalled the end of the English mobile hospital. It is thought that at that time a large war and the French left Maastricht on 3 February, 1749. church was made available in the town and according to Pringle it was thanks to that huge space that no infectious diseases broke out, despite the accumulation of sick and wounded English hospitals troops. It is also thought that a house in Wyck was used by the director of the English hospital. At the time of the battle of On 26 July, 1746, the English allies of the Republic established Lafelt, Pringle was staying with the British troops in the field a permanent hospital in Maastricht. We do not know in which and may have been involved in the care of the wounded in building this hospital was housed. Sir John Pringle (1707-1782), Maastricht. the famous English physician, was in charge. Pringle was an authority on military medicine; in 1752 he wrote the classic book Observations on the Diseases of the Army. In 1763 a Dutch translation was published titled Aanmerkingen over de ziekten bij een heirleger. The British troops that were wounded in the battle of Rocourt on 11 October, 1746 were taken to this


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