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Inhabitants Maastricht Period (estimated) number of inhabitants x 1000 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 750-1000 1500 1273 5000 1400 10.000 1500 10.000 16 1600 12.500 1650 20.000 1710 22.500 1750 18.200 1794 17.000 1806 18.500 1850 23.400 1900 34.000 1925 60.000 1950 90.000 1975 111.000 2000 108.000 2010 118.600 References: Kemp AGH. Het verloop van de bevolkingscurve van Maastricht tot 1830. In: Miscellanea Trajectensia. Maastricht: Limburgs geschied- en oudheidkundig genootschap;1962. p.339-362. Ubachs P. Evers I. Historische Encyclopedie Maastricht. Maastricht: Walburg Pers/Regionaal Historisch Centrum Limburg; 2005.p.609. institutions. With these patients too, isolation was more they could expect. Medicine was held in low repute and was important than treatment in order to protect the town generally distrusted. community. Elsewhere in Europe, medicine was being re-invented, however. In Padua in 1543, Vesalius described the human anatomy. In Basel, Paracelsus introduced chemistry into medicine. In Paris, Health care around 1600 Ambroise Paré made breakthroughs in military surgery. In London in 1628, William Harvey described the blood After the renaissance and the invention of the printing press circulation. Leiden University, especially under the leadership the number of doctors with a university education increased in of Boerhaave, became a respected centre of education in Maastricht. These doctors were educated at the new clinical medicine. universities in the Northern Netherlands, such as Leiden, Utrecht, Franeker and Groningen. These medicinae doctores made home visits to more affl uent patients. The town appointed Military hospital town doctors who were responsible for the health of the poor. In 1651, the guild of barber-surgeons was established at So far the medical history of Maastricht, apart from the Maastricht. Despite the quantitative increase in the medical pilgrimage aspect, is probably not very different to that of other profession, real progress in medical care was still a long way Dutch towns, like Middelburg, Deventer or ’s Hertogenbosch. off. The ancient Galenic pattern remained gospel. Sick people Starting in the seventeenth century, however, medicine in usually fi rst turned to folk medicine and the medical market Maastricht took a different course of development, largely due before putting themselves at the mercy of a barber-surgeon or to the town’s militarily strategic position. Because of its doctor. Bloodletting was only the least daunting of treatments geographical situation, Maastricht became an important


Geneeskundeboek-Opmaak Binnenwerk-ENG.indd
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