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Dr Theodoor Left: The ophthalmology clinic at the Prins Bisschopsingel in 1909. | RHCL GAM inv nr 2 Swart Abrahamsz Right: Dr. Theodoor Swart Abrahamsz (1848 -1912). | Boelen Uitgevers Amsterdam 1976 169 charge, but the rate for hospital care was increased gradually, 'Dr Swart Abrahamsz (1848-1912) was probably a man of the world. He was born on the ship of his fi rst to 1.75 guilders a day and in 1948 to four guilders per day. father, Cornelis Abrahamsz, somewhere off the island Dr van der Meer died in 1933. In the memorial book of the Mauritius as the youngest child of Catharina Douwes Dekker, the sister of Eduard Douwes Dekker, whom sisters of mercy of the holy Carolus Borromeus it is said we know as Multatuli. He added the name Swart, emphatically that he, even though he was a protestant, from his grandmother, to his father's name. He worked on his doctoral degree in medicine with the cooperated with the sisters in a most pleasant manner to serve ophthalmologist F.C. Donders (1818-1889) and then the interests of the patients and that the eye clinic owes its joined the navy as health offi cer and went to Indonesia. In 1888 he published a small book 'Eduard Douwes excellent reputation to his work. He was succeeded by his son Dekker. A history of disease', in which he presented a Dr B.C.J. van der Meer, until then assistant to the Amsterdam psychological analysis of Multatuli. He thought that his uncle suffered from a nervous disorder. This caused ophthalmologist Professor Dr W.C.P. Zeeman, who supervised many reactions. Swart Abrahamsz married twice and had his dissertation on a study of the treatment of retinal two illegitimate children. It is not clear how he ended up in Maastricht. His sudden departure may have been detachment. related to the provincial atmosphere and the mentality Immediately after the start of the Second World War in the capital of Limburg.' the institution was made available for the care of surgical (From: W.F. Hermans. De raadselachtige Multatuli) patients from the Calvariënberg hospital and for wounded civilians and prisoners of war. In 1942, J.A.J. van Acker was appointed second physician. After World War II the number of members declined and grants decreased but the clinic continued to function well with an undiminished fl ood of patients. In 1954 the work of the clinic was taken over by the ophthalmology department of the Sint Annadal hospital which had opened in 1959. The institution was dissolved and the building was sold to the Foundation of Homes for the Blind. The proceeds of the capital of the 'Association' were used to promote ophthalmology and for the benefi t of eye sufferers. On 1 December, 1954, the Limburgs Dagblad wrote that this was the end of an institution that for more than half a century had been a blessing to Maastricht and the wider region.


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