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Geneeskundeboek-Opmaak Binnenwerk-ENG.indd

Left: Hospital Calvariënberg. Radiology department, ca. 1910 | RHCL, GAM F 12370 Right: Pavilion for chronic 157 pulmonary patients (about 1920), Calvariënberg hospital. | RHCL, GAM F 14961 Left below: Medical Staff and Personnel Calvariënberg 1901. | RHCL Right below: Aerial photography Calvariënberg 1962. | RHCL. GAM F 13766 Foto Naseman Page 158-159: Opening of the new entrance of the hospital Calvariënberg 1924. rooms. In 1926 the construction of the hospital for epidemics was commenced and central heating and hot and cold running water were installed. Hintzen also arranged that the administration of the hospital was fully separated from that of the other institutions administered by the Burgerlijk Armbestuur. Within the available square meters the number of patients continued to grow and new specialties and specialists arrived. Nursing staff, mostly nuns, also increased rapidly. Hintzen failed to find a lasting solution to the problem of available space. Discontent remained and there were many and long periods of doubt. Several plans that all failed to materialise followed in rapid succession. This included the plan of architect Cuypers to build an entirely new hospital that could accommodate six hundred beds. When Dr Hintzen died in 1934, discussions were still continuing. But under his successor, Dr Ch. Mendes de Leon (1893-1862), definitive steps were taken. In 1940, the construction of a new hospital at the western boundary of the town was started. Due to the war and shortage of materials, construction was delayed considerably, but in 1950 the Calvariënberg hospital was abandoned for the move to the new Sint Annadal hospital with 350 beds.


Geneeskundeboek-Opmaak Binnenwerk-ENG.indd
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