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155 Left: St. Elisabeth building ca. 1928. | RHCL, GAM F 12370 Right: New operating room Calvariënberg hospital, ca. 1910. | RHCL, GAM F 12755 Below: Department pulmonary functiontest, Calvariënberg hospital, ca. 1900-1910. | RHCL Van Kleef’s reputation, but also the doubling of the capacity of the hospital, led to a rapid increase in the number of patients. The annual number of patients increased from four-hundred patients per year in the old hospital to two thousand in the first years of the twentieth century. With this the hospital had reached its maximum capacity. The number of paying class patients also rose, from 192 in 1901 to 475 in 1920. Around thirty per cent of patients were from outside Maastricht. The cost of one day in the hospital was less than one guilder per day and for class patients it was 1.78 guilders. The average number of hospital days halved and the hospital had in all respects become an institution of medical treatment. Chronically ill and elderly patients also benefited from the new hospital: their facilities in the adjoining old Calvariënberg Institution for the Sick and Disabled was much more spacious. The population of the town increased fast and with it the demand for hospital care. The hospital was not equipped for this. In 1900, a separate paediatric ward was set up. Plans to build an extra barracks for contagious diseases were not implemented, however. In 1913, a new X-ray laboratory was established. In order to meet the need for more space, Jos Cuypers, an architect from Roermond, (1861 -1949), was asked to draw up an extension plan. Fears that it was going to take too long, led to rejection of Cuypers’ plans, and in 1920 it


Geneeskundeboek-Opmaak Binnenwerk-ENG.indd
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