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Geneeskundeboek-Opmaak Binnenwerk-ENG.indd

Support of the province for the founding of a clinical school. Annuaire de la 128 Province de Limbourg 1825. | Municipal library Maastricht Centre Ceramique But the midwifery school of 1825 did meet with success. In the Provincial Committees. Because of the Belgian uprising, the first five years of its existence, 57 midwives were trained. Most government needed health officers and the Royal Decree students came from outside Maastricht. This caused marked the return to the old master-apprentice training model. considerable difficulties at the time of the Belgian uprising in The richly variegated pattern of recognised medical 1830, when travel to and from Maastricht was disrupted. professionals continued until 1865. In that year, Thorbecke’s The number of students declined as a result. Also after 1839 poor laws put an end to the distinction between university when a final agreement was reached with Belgium after its educated doctors and surgeons trained in practice and that secession, did the decline in the number of students continue. between town doctor and country doctor. This heralded the As a result the Provincial Executive withdrew funding of the arrival of the medical doctor, a professional who, to the school, which ceased to exist. exclusion of others, was granted the exclusive right to practise The Maastricht school for pharmacists met with a similar fate. medicine, surgery and obstetric medicine. Martin Martens, ‘Magister philos. Naturalis et medicinae doctor’ was appointed at an annual salary of four hundred guilders to teach preparation of medicines. F. Marres, pharmacist at Calvariënberg, became chemical preparator with an annual salary of seventy-five guilders. Fifteen students enrolled in the first year and eighteen in the second year. Of these students about half were from Maastricht. The school was housed in the Calvariënberg hospital, and this soon caused conflict about the use of classrooms and rent. A plan to build a new laboratory especially for the school in the garden of the hospital never materialised. The province supported the plan, but the town and the hospital refused to participate financially, which caused the plan to fall through. This is probably also the reason why Maastricht has never had a botanical garden. After the Belgian uprising the school for pharmacists faced similar problems as the school for midwives, and in 1850 closed its doors. The other clinical schools in the Netherlands also ran into difficulties after 1830. This was due to a Royal Decree of 27 May, 1830, which obviated to need to have attended such a school in order to be admitted to the examinations of the


Geneeskundeboek-Opmaak Binnenwerk-ENG.indd
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